Review: Nina Raine's funny, sharp and intelligent Consent, National Theatre
Review: Precision and poise in Compagnie XY's #ItsNotYetMidnight, Roundhouse

Coming soon: My picks from London's fringe theatre

Light
The Gap in the Light, New Diorama

Feel I should apologise as I've been a bit lax in publishing my fringe theatre picks for the last couple of months (blame the day job). Anyway to remedy that, here are a handful of forthcoming productions that look interesting.

Globalisation When work knows no borders, what's the cost? Alexandra Badea's explosive drama The Pulverised is a portrait of globalisation’s far-reaching grip on our working lives. A quality assurance officer from France, a call centre manager from Senegal, a factory worker from China, and an engineer from Romania - in four corners of the world, they are all engaged in one struggle: the multinational conglomerate they work for is trying to engulf their every waking moment. Arcola Theatre, Dalston - 3.30/8pm start, 90 minutes.

19th Century feminist icon Award-winning journalist Paul Mason's debut play The Divine Chaos of Starry Things is based on the memoirs of 19th century French feminist Louise Michel. The production examines the agony of the defeat and exile of the Parisian women revolutionaries deported to the remote Pacific island of New Caledonia, their depression and isolation upon arrival and loss of hope as dreams of escape fade and a new reality descends. White Bear Theatre, Kennington, 25 April to 20 May, 3pm/4pm/7.30pm.

Psychological thriller The Gap In The Light tells the story of two climbers making a deep descent into somewhere they don’t belong. What they encounter in the dark feels real, but what they bring back with them, into the light, will change everything. Engineer Theatre Collective's production explores what it is to be truly afraid, tracing the nightmares that disturb the sleep of our modern world and asks, how far do we have to fall, and who will catch us when the rope snaps? New Diorama Theatre, Euston, 2-27 May, 7.30pm

Othello updated Following on from a critically acclaimed run at Bristol's Tobacco Factory Theatre, Richard Twyman's production comes to London. A masterful depiction of a life torn apart by racism and the destructive nature of prejudice, this modern retelling takes the timeless tale of love, jealousy and injustice and re-imagines it in the present day. Wilton's Music Hall, Whitechapel, 16 May- 3 June, 2.30/7.30pm

Disability in Nazi Germany: "I used to be scared of them.  They seemed so different.  They don’t scare me anymore.  They’re just children, aren’t they?  Just children.’. Director Stephen Unwin directs his debut play All Our Children which shows a world caught in a spiral of horror and examines a brutal system which sanctioned mass murder for those who led, what the Nazis called ‘lives unworthy of life’. Jermyn St Theatre 26 April - 3 June, 3.30/7.30pm

 

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